gailsimone:

demonsee:

Wonder Woman Cosplayed by V330 Creations, photographed by WeNeals

COLOR!
Also, man, this looks fantastic. Good job, everyone!

gailsimone:

demonsee:

Wonder Woman Cosplayed by V330 Creations, photographed by WeNeals

COLOR!

Also, man, this looks fantastic. Good job, everyone!

thehappysorceress:

Invisible Girl by slangmead

thehappysorceress:

Invisible Girl by slangmead

Modesitt is one of those you see on the shelf all the time but don’t know if you should pick up—maybe I’ll give them a shot! Also, Oroonoko! Not one I would’ve ever expected to see! But idk how i feel about picking 5th Elephant over Nightwatch. :-b
I would recommend giving The Magic of Recluse a try - I read some of Modesitt’s others and some were good (when I was about 12-16) but I don’t think anything ever recaptured the…
magic.
B-)
In all honesty Nightwatch is probably the better book - but as great as Vimes is, the reason I really love the Vimes books is the supporting cast, especially Cheery, Angua and Carrot, so as great as it is I have more affection for Fifth Elephant.

gailsimone:

fuckyeahdcu:

Close-Ups on Detail of Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman costume for Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice

Okay, the heels are weird.

But I am pretty encouraged. This looks like a Wonder Woman who kicks ass.

It is SO important to SO many people that they get this right. I hope they understand the responsibility they have to people, not just women, all over the world.

Basically this costume is pretty good. I love the tiara, I love the bracers (though we don’t have a great view). I love the belt and the logo on the chest. I love the leather harness. The boots suck. OH MY GOD SHE HAS THE LASSO. IS IT SILVER? WHO CARES SHE HAS THE LASSO.

dcwomenkickingass:

Here’s Your First Look at Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman
The DC Movie Panel is going on in Hall H at SDCC and on-stage are Affleck, Carvill and Gadot. And they just showed this image. Are those heels on the boots? Close to the Chiang look but not exact. What do you think? 

My first reaction could be summed up as, “Ok so far…” and a sensation of waiting for the other shoe to drop.

dcwomenkickingass:

Here’s Your First Look at Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman

The DC Movie Panel is going on in Hall H at SDCC and on-stage are Affleck, Carvill and Gadot. And they just showed this image. Are those heels on the boots? Close to the Chiang look but not exact. What do you think? 

My first reaction could be summed up as, “Ok so far…” and a sensation of waiting for the other shoe to drop.

jadesabre301 tagged me and I’ve been disobeying instructions and trying to wait til I had a lot of time to do this and I haven’t, so I’m just going to just do it!

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag [ten] friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let your friends know you’ve tagged them.

1. The Hobbit, J.R.R. Tolkien
Don’t even know what to say.

2. The Magic of Recluse, L.E. Modesitt Jr.
I re-read this several times this book as a kid. I wonder if I would like it as much now, but I remember it as a grounded hero’s journey with lots of details that made it feel real - like the hero carefully negotiating prices at inns, since he’s on a budget and doesn’t tend to wander into ancient treasure hordes. It’s a fantasy world where the social and economic effects of fantasy concepts is really well explored: the fractured political climate when a single rogue wizard can turn the tide of a war, the systemic impact of mass-produced magic items, ways that minor wizards can make a living using their skills.

3. Pattern Recognition, William Gibson
I adore Gibson, especially the latest phase of his career - science fiction that feels like it could happen in six months, or perhaps is happening now and only a few people know about it.

4. The Caves of Steel, Isaac Asimov
I went through a long Isaac Asimov phase as a teen, and this was always my favorite.

5. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
There’s a lot I could say but I’ll mention that the story of the writing of this book is one of my favorite historical anecdotes of all time.

6. Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen
I love Austen. This was the first by her I read as an adult. And Elinor is perhaps my favorite heroine.

7. Sunshine, Robin McKinley
Just so good, we should all read Robin McKinley all the time.

8. Oroonoko, Aphra Behn
I think if I read this now I’d see more clearly how problematic it is, but it was the first thing I ever read by Behn, whose work I really like. It’s the sexiest stuff I’ve ever read that’s over a hundred years old.

9. The Fifth Elephant, Terry Pratchett
My favorite guards book, with lots of Cheery, Sybil, Angua, and the most insight we’ll probably get into the inner workings of Carrot.

10. History of the Peloponessian War, Thucydides
Feel obligated to say I haven’t read this all the way through, but whenever I sit and read a section I find it fascinating, and that it scratches an itch in my brain that very few things do. The kind of story that Thucydides unfolds is one I think is really interesting.

bluntcrusher:

lets blow this joint

image

AND FUCK SHIT UP

image

(via armalis)

policymic:

Coaches told Taylor Townsend she was too heavy to succeed — she showed them

An 18-year-old American tennis player beat the No. 1-ranked French player Alize Cornet on her own soil in the second round of the French Open last week. Taylor Townsend, the teenager from Chicago, didn’t just make a powerful statement by beating the No. 22 seed in her debut main draw at a Grand Slam, however. Townsend’s victory sent a message to those who make assumptions or discriminate against female athletes on body image. 

Read more | Follow policymic

(via coriana)