Dave City

Sep 30

lowtideandhightea said: Kind of. You'll be able to download it on to multiple computers definitely, but you won't be able to both be online in origin and playing at the same time. However, one of you can play in "offline mode" on origin at the same time as the other is also playing.

Thanks!

Posting for anyone else who was wondering whether multiple people can play DA:I on one Origin account.

Dragon Age DRM question

Here’s an Dragon Age: Inquisition question for Bioware fans who play on PC.

My girlfriend and I both love Dragon Age and are both going to want to ravenously tear through the new game when it comes out. We’ve played every entry in the series on our shared X-Box which gets REALLY complicated when a new game comes out (“Sweetie, I’m going to play Dragon Age tonight and I’m ahead of you, so close the bedroom door and call my cell if you need to leave that room for any reason or you’ll get spoiled”) , but this time around we may possibly both have laptops that can run it (something that was not true in past years). 

I’m not very familiar with Origin (referring here to EA’s Steam-like “service” and no DA:O) but I assume it’s the DRM that DRM has nightmares about. If we did buy the game for PC, is it likely Origin would permit us to install it on multiple PCs and play on both at the same time?

Sep 28

[video]

Sep 10

themediafix:


Happy Internet Slowdown Day! 
Take action to save Net Neutrality: http://bit.ly/1qLsc6U

themediafix:

Happy Internet Slowdown Day! 

Take action to save Net Neutrality: http://bit.ly/1qLsc6U

(via ruckawriter)

Sep 09

[video]

Sep 07

To all my female gamer followers -

kate-wisehart:

wrathomatic:

What, in a main protagonist, would make you feel represented positively and empowered in a video game?

I’m making a video game and being a young man I want to be as accurate to women as I can, as the leading hero is a woman

The game offers a lot of…

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

kate-wisehart:

wrathomatic:

What, in a main protagonist, would make you feel represented positively and empowered in a video game?

I’m making a video game and being a young man I want to be as accurate to women as I can, as the leading hero is a woman

The game offers a lot of choices when it comes to things like opinions and sexualities, but what sort of subtleties do you ladies find appropriate and positive in a game that makes you feel properly represented?

I’d love some feedback in the ask box. Thank you! :)

Realistic armor, less jiggle-physics, and a backstory that doesn’t involve sexual assault is my holy trio of game fantasies.

I second the holy trio.

Anyway, followers, signal boost! Some more ideas?

~Ozzie

I’m a male game dev, and making games that women can enjoy, and which include positive portrayals of women, is a huge priority for me. I ask myself a few questions as I’m working.

First and foremost:

Is this something I’d be excited to show to one of the women in my life?

If the answer isn’t yes - even if it’s “maybe,” then what you have isn’t quite right yet.

Relating to protagonists in particular:

Does this person do lots of cool and exciting things I’d like to imagine myself doing?

Are the decisions this person makes the most important decisions in this story?

(Both of those apply to any protagonist, naturally.)

And finally, because anything you make is part of a much larger cultural conversation:

Have I seen this thing I’m putting into this game before in other games and stories? (I personally am at the point in my craft where the answer to this is probably yes).

What did it mean when I saw it before?

Why am I using it now?

That last set is really useful for me and shows me all sorts of mistakes. It’s really easy to learn the wrong lessons from media you enjoy, and borrow the bad along with the good.

I have met some of the most amazing women I have ever known through the game industry. Larger-than-life, funny, warm, sweet, razor-sharp, overeducated women, the kind who laugh too loudly in quiet rooms. It’s been a long time since I’ve heard most of them laugh. One of them IMed me today about how she was leaving the industry and she couldn’t handle the idea of disappointing me but she just couldn’t take it any more, and I told her it was okay, it’s fine, self-care is so important, because it is.

The truth is that after our conversation ended, I put my head in my hands and cried.

I could tell you stories about the voices we’ve lost, the women we’ve scarred, the people we’ve left behind. I want to, but I’m not sure you’d get it. I tweeted earlier today, We should have a war memorial for all of the women we have lost to this. We should lay flowers and grieve and see our reflections in stone. And I meant it. I wish there were a way to honor the people our industry has wronged, and a way to visualize the enormity of what we have lost because of it— some representation of the gap between what games are and what they can be, and the pieces of the bridge between that have fallen away.

” — Elizabeth Sampat writes on women in the games industry, spinning off Zoe Quinn’s situation. Read the whole thing. It’s a shotgun blast of a piece. The last line of the whole thing is my takeaway from the last few weeks. (via kierongillen)

(via christinelove)

Sep 05

“You are like the wicked witch to video games. I hate you.” —

- Hate mail of the day (via femfreq)

I doubt the troll intended the allusion to the novel and musical Wicked, but the comparison to an astute critic speaking truth to power despite the anger of the privileged is apt.

Idina is a little old to play Anita in Tropes Vs. the Musical, but I think it could work. 

nowisthewinter:

Sketchtember Day 4: Wonder Woman
Because I can never draw Diana enough.

nowisthewinter:

Sketchtember Day 4: Wonder Woman

Because I can never draw Diana enough.

(via thehappysorceress)

twapa:

wondy sketch

twapa:

wondy sketch

(via thehappysorceress)