nowisthewinter:

Sketchtember Day 4: Wonder Woman
Because I can never draw Diana enough.

nowisthewinter:

Sketchtember Day 4: Wonder Woman

Because I can never draw Diana enough.

(via thehappysorceress)

twapa:

wondy sketch

twapa:

wondy sketch

(via thehappysorceress)

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

totallynotabadvirus:

I just bought my Wonder Woman comic and these were the last two pages. Wonder woman makes me extremely happy.

I miss this sort of wonder woman so much. And this scene is just miles better than the similar one from Justice League: War.

superdames:

Freedom & victory.
—Legends #6 (1987) script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

superdames:

Freedom & victory.

—Legends #6 (1987) script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

superdames:

Wonder Woman is (re-)introduced to the rebooted 1980s DC Universe.
After DC Comics rebooted in the 1980s, it published the miniseries Legends to (re-)introduce a lot of its lesser-known (non-Superman, non-Batman) characters. Wonder Woman’s rebooted solo book by George Pérez was just a few months old by the time she appeared in Legends, but here was her first appearance in the wider DC Universe — and apparently one of her first times outside of Themyscira. Guy Gardner (the first to encounter her in Legends) and the public at large don’t even know who she is. She just bursts on the scene and tells everyone to get their act together.
I loved it.
It was treated very much like an introduction to a new character, or at least a new readership for an old character — and it totally worked on me. I had just started reading comics around this time, and I came to DC from the Christopher Reeve Superman movies. I knew who Wonder Woman was, of course — I’d seen Super Friends and read some Justice League back-issues — but this Wonder Woman was powerful, confident, independent, and mysterious. Not to mention John Byrne, one of the biggest superstar artists of the era, was at the top of his game.
At the end of Legends, when the rest of the heroes are patting themselves on the back and doing that whole “Maybe we should form a team” thing, Wonder Woman quietly sneaks away unnoticed.
"Dang," I thought, "Wonder Woman is on a whole other level."
—Image from Legends #6 (1987), script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

superdames:

Wonder Woman is (re-)introduced to the rebooted 1980s DC Universe.

After DC Comics rebooted in the 1980s, it published the miniseries Legends to (re-)introduce a lot of its lesser-known (non-Superman, non-Batman) characters. Wonder Woman’s rebooted solo book by George Pérez was just a few months old by the time she appeared in Legends, but here was her first appearance in the wider DC Universe — and apparently one of her first times outside of Themyscira. Guy Gardner (the first to encounter her in Legends) and the public at large don’t even know who she is. She just bursts on the scene and tells everyone to get their act together.

I loved it.

It was treated very much like an introduction to a new character, or at least a new readership for an old character — and it totally worked on me. I had just started reading comics around this time, and I came to DC from the Christopher Reeve Superman movies. I knew who Wonder Woman was, of course — I’d seen Super Friends and read some Justice League back-issues — but this Wonder Woman was powerful, confident, independent, and mysterious. Not to mention John Byrne, one of the biggest superstar artists of the era, was at the top of his game.

At the end of Legends, when the rest of the heroes are patting themselves on the back and doing that whole “Maybe we should form a team” thing, Wonder Woman quietly sneaks away unnoticed.

"Dang," I thought, "Wonder Woman is on a whole other level."

—Image from Legends #6 (1987), script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

jeandrawsstuff:

I get a little angry when I hear about someone saying that they hate Wonder Woman or that they think she’s boring. I LOVE Wonder Woman, as a character and as an icon, I probably draw her more than I draw any other superhero. In the comics, animated shows and movies, she’s such an amazing person, intelligent, dignified and elegant, yet warm and approachable. Plus, she’s a brilliant fighter and strategist, who can fight individually and within a group. Not to mention, she’s a diplomat! She can fight a war, but she has the ability to end it before it even begins.
Wonder Woman is awesome. Period. 

jeandrawsstuff:


I get a little angry when I hear about someone saying that they hate Wonder Woman or that they think she’s boring. I LOVE Wonder Woman, as a character and as an icon, I probably draw her more than I draw any other superhero. In the comics, animated shows and movies, she’s such an amazing person, intelligent, dignified and elegant, yet warm and approachable. Plus, she’s a brilliant fighter and strategist, who can fight individually and within a group. Not to mention, she’s a diplomat! She can fight a war, but she has the ability to end it before it even begins.

Wonder Woman is awesome. Period. 

ombyes:

A grainy alternative wonder woman

ombyes:

A grainy alternative wonder woman

(via thehappysorceress)

thehappysorceress:

Wonder Woman by SDCC 2014 by Terry Dodson

thehappysorceress:

Wonder Woman by SDCC 2014 by Terry Dodson